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Sunday, August 17, 2014

American Studies Director Micki McGee Wins ASA Claude Award for Neurodiversity Article

American Studies
Director Micki McGee

The American Sociological Association's Claude Award was presented to Professor Micki McGee this weekend at the ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco.  McGee received the award for her essay on neurodiversity published in Contexts in Summer 2012.  The Claude Awards are designed to recognize "outstanding contributions to Contexts . . . as judged by the members of the magazine's editorial board." The award series is named after Claude Fischer, the ASA magazine's founding editor.  Please join us in congratulating Professor McGee on this honor.

Friday, February 28, 2014

Christina Greer's Black Ethnics Wins 2014 W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award

American Studies and Political Science Professor Christina Greer’s Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford, 2013) has been awarded the National Conference of Black Political Scientists’ 2014 W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Book Award. One member of the awards committee noted that Professor Greer's scholarship fundamentally reorients the way that we must think about African American politics and race relations in the United States, observing that the book is “game changer in the fields of African-American politics and racial and ethnic politics.” Congratulations to Professor Greer on this exemplary professional recognition!

Anthropologist and American Studies Professor Ayala Fader Garners NSF Support

Professor Ayala Fader
Anthropologist and American Studies Professor Ayala Fader has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to support her project, "Religious Orthodoxy and New Media Technologies."  The project builds upon Dr. Fader's research on non-liberal Jews in Brooklyn and shows how the contemporary struggle over the Internet and other new media is part of a wider generational backlash against a "slide to the right."  More broadly, Fader's scholarship shows how new media acts as a lightening rod for wider changes and debates about morality, citizenship, difference, and shifting communal boundaries. Congratulations to Professor Fader!

Sunday, January 26, 2014

Catch Christina Greer on NY1 News Tuesday Evening After the State of the Union Address

American Studies and Political Science professor Christina Greer
comments on the inauguration of Mayor Bill De Blasio, January 1, 2014.
American Studies and Political Science professor Christina Greer —who has been a featured commentator on NY1 News throughout the recent mayoral race — will provide analysis on NY1 again this coming Tuesday evening, January 28th, after the State of the Union address.

Tune in on Tuesday evening around 10pm (or just after the President's address wraps up) to catch her stellar commentary, or check out her recent Op-Ed in the New York Times. You can also follow Professor Greer on Twitter @Dr_CMGreer.

Greer is the author of the recent monograph Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

American Studies Senior Thesis Symposium & Annual Celebration | Monday, December 9th, 11-5:30

Please join us for all or part of the American Studies Senior Thesis Symposium and Annual Celebration next Monday, December 9th. The talks run from 11am to 4pm in the O'Hare Special Collections Room on the 4th floor of Walsh Library, and are followed by a gala reception that runs from 4 until 5:30.


Topics this year include: masculinity in the American West, hair straighteners and black identity, the rise of zombie dystopias in The Walking Dead, street art, the closure of Brooklyn's 5Pointz and other adventures in hip-hop culture, Irish dance and the Irish diaspora, the NFL and the U.S. military, the transfeminine prison experience, black Dandyism and street etiquette, disposable culture and the Solo cup, choral arrangements of spirituals, U.S. intervention in Peru, the perils of the "Hastert Rule," critical analyses of Breaking Bad, Beverly Hills 90210 and Gossip Girl, and much, much more.

Faculty discussion moderators will include Seminar Directors Professors Christiana Z. Peppard (Theology) and Dennis Tyler (English) along with Professors Margaret Schwartz (Communications), Kirsten Swinth (History), O. Hugo Benavides (Anthropology) and American Studies Director Micki McGee (Sociology).

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Peppard on Pope Francis: ". . . he's a lot more Karl Marx's economic analysis meets Jesus in the underbelly of 21st century capitalism."

Christiana Peppard on Pope Francis' Evangelii Gaudium
Earlier this week Pope Francis released an apostolic exhortation denouncing economic inequality and free market ideology, noting that:

"While the earnings of a minority are growing exponentially, so too is the gap separating the majority from the prosperity enjoyed by those happy few. This imbalance is the result of ideologies which defend the absolute autonomy of the marketplace and financial speculation."

Fordham American Studies and Theology Professor Christiana Z. Peppard, who specializes in ethics, joined Bloomberg TV's Street Smart to discuss the Pope's Evangelii Gaudium and summed up the Pope's position: "He's not Milton Friedman — he's a lot more Karl Marx's economic analysis meets Jesus in the underbelly of 21st century capitalism." Peppard praised the potential of the Pope's exhortation to turn Catholic's toward "the broader swath of Catholic social teaching." See the full interview with Professor Peppard on Bloomberg TV.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

American Studies Professor Dennis Tyler, Jr. on "What Ralph Ellison Can Teach Us About Trayvon Martin"

Ralph Ellison
Read American Studies Professor Dennis Tyler, Jr. on "What Ralph Ellison Can Teach Us About Trayvon Martin" at Feminist Wire. Tyler notes . . .

"In light of the recent decision by the school board of education in Randolph County, North Carolina, to ban Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man from their libraries—partly because of a parent’s complaint that the book is not age-appropriate material for teenagers and partly because one board member claimed he could not “find any literary value” in the text—I cannot help but reflect on a few of the key lessons I’ve learned from the novel, particularly as I attempt to cope with the verdict in the Zimmerman trial." Continue reading at The Feminist Wire . . .